Random Thoughts: A Mindful Miscellany

from Marcus Wynne

A Lofty Wiseman Meme, Training Research Survey, and Some Random War Stories

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Lofty meme
courtesy of Gaelic Warlord Ed B – thanks, Ed!

The research team at Accentus-Ludus is busy working on a survey to gather data for a research paper/product we’re working on.

Can I ask you readers for some help?

The purpose of the survey is to gather data about the neural-based training that we do to support the continuing evolution of our training protocols. We’ve saved many thousands of lives in 25 years through our training – something we’re proud of.

We need data from people who have trained directly with me over the last 25+ years, people who have trained directly with an instructor who’s trained directly with me, and people who have not trained with me and have backgrounds in law enforcement, military (especially military special operations), high threat private sector security (PSD, etc.) and other high-stress professions (EMS, courtroom litigators, doctors, aviation, etc.).

The survey is COMPLETELY anonymous. You cannot be tied by name to any of the data. It takes between 15-30 minutes to fill out. You can skip questions that don’t pertain or you’re not comfortable answering.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SX35DJV

Again, if you haven’t trained with me personally, you may have trained with some of the high level trainers that have who’ve utilized the neural-based training concepts (especially around situational awareness and vision skills).

If you are in one of the professions listed and haven’t trained in our methods, please feel free to participate as a control subject: law enforcement, military (especially military special operations), high threat private sector security (PSD, etc.) and other high-stress professions (EMS, courtroom litigators, doctors, aviation, etc.).

The final research product for this survey is a peer-reviewed published paper in a major psychology journal. The research paper and data will be available to all.

One of the very cool things about this survey is that it’s put me in touch with a lot of the operators and regular folks I’ve trained all over the world in the last 25 years. Some great stories (and some sad ones, too). These fall into the category of “anecdotal” data, so I just present them here as a way of sharing stories:

A police tactical officer in his first shooting puts a 2 round burst between the eyes of a felon firing a shotgun at the officer and his partner. His actions save the lives of several other team members.
Skills used: state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); vision skills (preventing tunnel vision through previous training and precise shot placement in close proximity to brother officers); temporal distortion (processing his temporal perception so as to maximize the use of “slowed down” time to get the best sight picture and precise trigger press).

An off-duty police officer is car-jacked and his 7-year old son taken hostage. In the fight, the officer kills 4 of the 6 armed attackers, rescues his son, and drives off the other 2 attackers.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); vision skills (preventing tunnel vision through previous training and precise shot placement in close proximity to his son); temporal distortion (processing his temporal perception so as to maximize the use of “slowed down” time to get the best sight picture and precise trigger press).

An on-duty police officer is ambushed. He’s shot in the head and completely through his heart. Despite his injuries, he pursues and brings down the shooter. The officer dies of his injuries while on scene.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); pain/wound management (controlling his pain response and body shut down to continue to fight despite non-survivable wounds).

A police officer’s home is invaded by four attackers armed with AK-47s. He’s shot in the torso while coming awake and going for his weapons. Despite being shot, he’s able to maintain control and consciousness while bound and beaten and bleeding. With the help of his wife and 4 year old son, he’s able to escape his bindings when the attackers flee upon discovering he’s a police officer. He fully recovers from his injuries and continues to operate and train to this day.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); pain/wound management (controlling his pain response and body shut down to continue to fight despite life-threatening wounds); retaining his higher order cognition to persuade the attackers to leave.

An operator in a military special operations unit kills (personally) 52 armed Taliban in one day during a mountain gunfight that rages for over 72 hours.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); rheostat concept of state access (dialing up his adrenal response when necessary and dialing it back during lulls in the fight so as to minimize adrenal exhaustion)

A woman is woken by a man crawling through her bedroom window. She beats him unconscious with her father’s Colt Dragoon pistol.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling her psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress);

A woman is confronted by a large, hostile, mentally disturbed male. She’s able to persuade the man not to harm her or anyone else and to leave the premises so she can notify police.
Skills used: state management (controlling his psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); retaining her higher order cognition during immediate onset threat to life in order to verbally manage the situation and persuade the threat to leave.

A probationary police officer with three months on the street is in the car with her Field Training Officer. Upon responding to a bank robbery in progress, she is confronted at close range by five men firing assault rifles at her. She’s able to debus the vehicle under fire, assist her FTO and retreat to better cover while fighting back with her 9mm pistol.
Skills used: state access (of the adrenalized fighting state); state management (controlling her psycho-physiological state during an immediate onset threat to life stress); vision skills (preventing tunnel vision through previous training and precise shot placement in close proximity to her partner); temporal distortion (processing her temporal perception so as to maximize the use of “slowed down” time to get the best sight picture and precise trigger press).

I have lots more, but that’s it for today.

Major kudos to all these brave men and women who are out there doing Good in the world. I’m very proud to have had some small part in their training. Your help with my research survey will help us continue to save the Good Guys and Gals lives.

sevensamurai-quote

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Written by marcuswynne

July 21, 2015 at 7:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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